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Session Recap: Productive Partnerships

Solid waste officials from Virginia and Delaware joined a representative from the Recycling Partnership to explore the potential advantages of public-private partnerships when seeking to optimize a public solid waste program. Craig Cookson, Senior Director of Recycling & Energy Recovery for the American Chemistry Council, teamed up with Kim Hynes, the Director of the Central Virginia Waste Management Authority (CVWMA), to discuss the positive results of the collaboration between their respective organizations.

Cookson, representing The Recycling Partnership, first shared the history of The Recycling Partnership and the state of recycling in the nation. The Recycling Partnership is a national non-profit organization “dedicated to transforming recycling in towns all across America.” According to Cookson, only 53% of the U.S. population have curbside recycling automatically provided. Of the 53% of homes with curbside recycling programs, only half the recyclable materials generated in those homes are actually being recycled. To improve recycling nationwide, The Recycling Partnership connects with municipalities to offer support and assistance.

CVWMA provides recycling and waste management solutions to 13 local governments in central Virginia, accounting for about 1.2 million people. As recycling tonnages consistently plateaued from 2008 to 2015, Director Kim Hynes began exploring ways to move the needle. The city of Richmond served as the pilot municipality for the CVWMA’s recycling revival. With political backing from the city’s elected officials, CVWMA pursued a grant opportunity with The Recycling Partnership to provide Richmond residents with 96-gallon recycling carts. The Partnership delivered about 62,000 carts to city residents throughout 2015. The Partnership also created flyers, posters, hand-outs and direct mailers to educate residents about the changes to the recycling program. So far, CVWMA has seen positive results. Bi-weekly set-out participation increased from 28% to 47% and recycling tonnages increased by 56% between 2015 and 2017.

Michael Parkowski of the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) joined the conversation to discuss Delaware’s partnerships with ReCommunity and Revolution Recovery. The state of Delaware enacted its Universal Recycling law in 2010, which requires that waste haulers who provide residential trash collection service must also provide single-stream recycling collection service. Consequently, the total of single stream recyclable materials collected has since doubled, making it necessary for Delaware to have its own materials recovery facility (MRF). The DSWA sent out an RFP for a third-party organization to renovate an unused state-owned facility into the new MRF. As a result, ReCommunity created a state-of-the art single stream MRF, while Revolution Recovery went on to process and recycle construction and demolition material at a new C&D MRF. As a result of these partnerships, the DSWA has reported an increase in the statewide recycling rate. With a low capital investment and the security of a 20-year contract with these partners, DSWA has seen a lot of advantages from a private-public partnership. However, there are downsides, too. DSWA has less control over daily operations of the MRFs, bears the risk of losing the facility and has to facilitate facility “housekeeping.” But, on the whole, Parkowski says DSWA is satisfied with the long-term partnerships they’ve formed to improve Delaware’s recycling program.

Article courtesy of Meghan G. Schatz, Baltimore County

Productive Partnerships

Kim Hynes, Director, Central VA Waste Management Authority

Craig Cookson, Senior Director, Recycling & Energy Recovery, American Chemistry Council

Michael Parkowski, Delaware Solid Waste Authority

 

Learn about the development, structure and operation of public-private, private-private partnerships that produce above-average results.

 

Solid waste officials from Virginia and Delaware joined a representative from the Recycling Partnership to explore the potential advantages of public-private partnerships when seeking to optimize a public solid waste program. Craig Cookson, Senior Director of Recycling & Energy Recovery for the American Chemistry Council, teamed up with Kim Hynes, the Director of the Central Virginia Waste Management Authority (CVWMA), to discuss the positive results of the collaboration between their respective organizations.

 

Cookson, representing The Recycling Partnership, first shared the history of The Recycling Partnership and the state of recycling in the nation. The Recycling Partnership is a national non-profit organization “dedicated to transforming recycling in towns all across America.” According to Cookson, only 53% of the U.S. population have curbside recycling automatically provided. Of the 53% of homes with curbside recycling programs, only half the recyclable materials generated in those homes are actually being recycled. To improve recycling nationwide, The Recycling Partnership connects with municipalities to offer support and assistance.

 

CVWMA provides recycling and waste management solutions to 13 local governments in central Virginia, accounting for about 1.2 million people. As recycling tonnages consistently plateaued from 2008 to 2015, Director Kim Hynes began exploring ways to move the needle. The city of Richmond served as the pilot municipality for the CVWMA’s recycling revival. With political backing from the city’s elected officials, CVWMA pursued a grant opportunity with The Recycling Partnership to provide Richmond residents with 96-gallon recycling carts. The Partnership delivered about 62,000 carts to city residents throughout 2015. The Partnership also created flyers, posters, hand-outs and direct mailers to educate residents about the changes to the recycling program. So far, CVWMA has seen positive results. Bi-weekly set-out participation increased from 28% to 47% and recycling tonnages increased by 56% between 2015 and 2017.

 

Michael Parkowski of the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) joined the conversation to discuss Delaware’s partnerships with ReCommunity and Revolution Recovery. The state of Delaware enacted its Universal Recycling law in 2010, which requires that waste haulers who provide residential trash collection service must also provide single-stream recycling collection service. Consequently, the total of single stream recyclable materials collected has since doubled, making it necessary for Delaware to have its own materials recovery facility (MRF). The DSWA sent out an RFP for a third-party organization to renovate an unused state-owned facility into the new MRF. As a result, ReCommunity created a state-of-the art single stream MRF, while Revolution Recovery went on to process and recycle construction and demolition material at a new C&D MRF. As a result of these partnerships, the DSWA has reported an increase in the statewide recycling rate. With a low capital investment and the security of a 20-year contract with these partners, DSWA has seen a lot of advantages from a private-public partnership. However, there are downsides, too. DSWA has less control over daily operations of the MRFs, bears the risk of losing the facility and has to facilitate facility “housekeeping.” But, on the whole, Parkowski says DSWA is satisfied with the long-term partnerships they’ve formed to improve Delaware’s recycling program.

Solid waste officials from Virginia and Delaware joined a representative from the Recycling Partnership to explore the potential advantages of public-private partnerships when seeking to optimize a public solid waste program. Craig Cookson, Senior Director of Recycling & Energy Recovery for the American Chemistry Council, teamed up with Kim Hynes, the Director of the Central Virginia Waste Management Authority (CVWMA), to discuss the positive results of the collaboration between their respective organizations.

Cookson, representing The Recycling Partnership, first shared the history of The Recycling Partnership and the state of recycling in the nation. The Recycling Partnership is a national non-profit organization “dedicated to transforming recycling in towns all across America.” According to Cookson, only 53% of the U.S. population have curbside recycling automatically provided. Of the 53% of homes with curbside recycling programs, only half the recyclable materials generated in those homes are actually being recycled. To improve recycling nationwide, The Recycling Partnership connects with municipalities to offer support and assistance.

CVWMA provides recycling and waste management solutions to 13 local governments in central Virginia, accounting for about 1.2 million people. As recycling tonnages consistently plateaued from 2008 to 2015, Director Kim Hynes began exploring ways to move the needle. The city of Richmond served as the pilot municipality for the CVWMA’s recycling revival. With political backing from the city’s elected officials, CVWMA pursued a grant opportunity with The Recycling Partnership to provide Richmond residents with 96-gallon recycling carts. The Partnership delivered about 62,000 carts to city residents throughout 2015. The Partnership also created flyers, posters, hand-outs and direct mailers to educate residents about the changes to the recycling program. So far, CVWMA has seen positive results. Bi-weekly set-out participation increased from 28% to 47% and recycling tonnages increased by 56% between 2015 and 2017.

Michael Parkowski of the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) joined the conversation to discuss Delaware’s partnerships with ReCommunity and Revolution Recovery. The state of Delaware enacted its Universal Recycling law in 2010, which requires that waste haulers who provide residential trash collection service must also provide single-stream recycling collection service. Consequently, the total of single stream recyclable materials collected has since doubled, making it necessary for Delaware to have its own materials recovery facility (MRF). The DSWA sent out an RFP for a third-party organization to renovate an unused state-owned facility into the new MRF. As a result, ReCommunity created a state-of-the art single stream MRF, while Revolution Recovery went on to process and recycle construction and demolition material at a new C&D MRF. As a result of these partnerships, the DSWA has reported an increase in the statewide recycling rate. With a low capital investment and the security of a 20-year contract with these partners, DSWA has seen a lot of advantages from a private-public partnership. However, there are downsides, too. DSWA has less control over daily operations of the MRFs, bears the risk of losing the facility and has to facilitate facility “housekeeping.” But, on the whole, Parkowski says DSWA is satisfied with the long-term partnerships they’ve formed to improve Delaware’s recycling program.

  Solid waste officials from Virginia and Delaware joined a representative from the Recycling Partnership to explore the potential advantages of public-private partnerships when seeking to optimize a public solid waste program. Craig Cookson, Senior Director of Recycling & Energy Recovery for the American Chemistry Council, teamed up with Kim Hynes, the Director of the Central Virginia Waste Management Authority (CVWMA), to discuss the positive results of the collaboration between their respective organizations.

Cookson, representing The Recycling Partnership, first shared the history of The Recycling Partnership and the state of recycling in the nation. The Recycling Partnership is a national non-profit organization “dedicated to transforming recycling in towns all across America.” According to Cookson, only 53% of the U.S. population have curbside recycling automatically provided. Of the 53% of homes with curbside recycling programs, only half the recyclable materials generated in those homes are actually being recycled. To improve recycling nationwide, The Recycling Partnership connects with municipalities to offer support and assistance.

CVWMA provides recycling and waste management solutions to 13 local governments in central Virginia, accounting for about 1.2 million people. As recycling tonnages consistently plateaued from 2008 to 2015, Director Kim Hynes began exploring ways to move the needle. The city of Richmond served as the pilot municipality for the CVWMA’s recycling revival. With political backing from the city’s elected officials, CVWMA pursued a grant opportunity with The Recycling Partnership to provide Richmond residents with 96-gallon recycling carts. The Partnership delivered about 62,000 carts to city residents throughout 2015. The Partnership also created flyers, posters, hand-outs and direct mailers to educate residents about the changes to the recycling program. So far, CVWMA has seen positive results. Bi-weekly set-out participation increased from 28% to 47% and recycling tonnages increased by 56% between 2015 and 2017.

Michael Parkowski of the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) joined the conversation to discuss Delaware’s partnerships with ReCommunity and Revolution Recovery. The state of Delaware enacted its Universal Recycling law in 2010, which requires that waste haulers who provide residential trash collection service must also provide single-stream recycling collection service. Consequently, the total of single stream recyclable materials collected has since doubled, making it necessary for Delaware to have its own materials recovery facility (MRF). The DSWA sent out an RFP for a third-party organization to renovate an unused state-owned facility into the new MRF. As a result, ReCommunity created a state-of-the art single stream MRF, while Revolution Recovery went on to process and recycle construction and demolition material at a new C&D MRF. As a result of these partnerships, the DSWA has reported an increase in the statewide recycling rate. With a low capital investment and the security of a 20-year contract with these partners, DSWA has seen a lot of advantages from a private-public partnership. However, there are downsides, too. DSWA has less control over daily operations of the MRFs, bears the risk of losing the facility and has to facilitate facility “housekeeping.” But, on the whole, Parkowski says DSWA is satisfied with the long-term partnerships they’ve formed to improve Delaware’s recycling program.